Monday, October 15, 2012

News and Notes: Monday Edition

Below, some news and notes for Monday...



  • The preseason is officially underway for Cornell Big Red Basketball.

  • In Lithuanian LKL action, Jeff Foote's (Cornell '10) Zaligiris team moved to 3-0 with an 80-76 overtime win on Sunday over Triumph.  Foote started the game and finished with 5 points and 2 rebounds in 15 minutes on 2/4 shooting from the floor.
  • In Greece A1 action, Louis Dale (Cornell '10) and his KAOD dropped the league opener 64-62 to Panionios.  Dale started the game, played 20 minutes and finished with an unsual stat line: 1 points (0/1 from the floor), 4 turnovers, 4 rebounds, 2 steals, 4 fouls.
  • In Mexico's LNBP on Saturday, Jeff Aubry (Cornell '99) finished with a solid 5 points and 6 rebounds off the bench as his Halcones Rojos defeated Huracanes, 88-78 and moved to 10-3 on the season and in 3rd place in the 16 team league.
  • Excluding Cornell's recruiting class, below is a list of players committed to Ivy League schools in the class of 2013:

    Lealand King (Brentwood School) Los Angeles, CA, 6-6, F, Brown
    Tavon Blackmon (Gonzaga) Washington, DC, 5-11, G, Brown
    Connor Voss (St. Cloud Cathederal HS) St. Cloud, MN, 6-11, C, Columbia
    Mike Flemming (Northfield Mount Hermon, MA) Lincolnshire, IL, 6-1, G, Dartmouth
    Hunter Meyers (Douglas HS) Minden, NV, 6-6, F, Harvard
    Zena Edosomwan (Northfield Mount Hermon, MA) Hollywood, CA, 6-9, F, Harvard
    Dave Winfield (Harvard Westlake HS) Hollywood, CA, 6-8, F, Penn
    Tony Bagtas (Westlake HS) Atlanta, GA, 5-11, G, Penn
    Hashim Moore (Hun School, NJ) Ft. Lauderdale, FL, 6-5, F, Princeton
    Spencer Weisz (Seton Hall Prep) Florham Park, NJ, 6-4, G, Princeton
    Steven Cook (New Trier HS) Winnetka, IL, 6-5, G, Princeton
    Pete Miller (Northfield Mount Hermon, MA) Northfield, MA, 6-10, C, Princeton
    Sam Downy (Lake Forest HS) Lake Forest, IL, 6-9, C, Yale
    Anthony Dallier (Northfield Mount Hermon, MA) Wexford, PA, 6-6, F, Yale
    JT Flowers (Lincoln HS) Portland, OR, 6-5, F, Yale

20 comments:

Anonymous said...

It's interesting you would tweet that you'd like to see Cornell refurbish and return to Barton Hall. A well done renovation of Barton could create something like the Palestra which has the best atmosphere in the Ivies.

I've always thought that Newman is functional but only functional. It's got a weird clinical, almost antiseptic, feel to it. The first thing Cornell needs to do is change out the bright flourescent lights to something incandescent so the place doesn't feel like you're about to get a medical exam.

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

You hit the nail on the head.

Anonymous said...

I played in the 50's in Barton Hall, and loved it. We had a serious adantage in that the space perspective was one we were used to, as opposed to others (who were not). However, the floor is so hard, that we all got shin splints about half way through the season. Playing Syracuse, or Princeton, Navy, brought 8000+ crowds - and we were very competitive. Also, the locker rooms would need to be upgraded - using the tunnel is not a good thing at half time. M

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

If Cornell were ever to go back to Barton, the gym would need millions of dollars in updates. But you have to love its beauty and history.

Games were played in Barton before the ball ever bounced in the Palestra or Hinkle Fieldhouse. Barton is a gem on the Cornell campus.

Truly amazing history to the building (including its role in World War II). Unfortunate that most Cornellians know nothing of it other than its use for concerts and pick up games.

Anonymous said...

Statistically, Princeton has by far the largest home court advantage in the Ivy League. (The Tigers enjoy a HCA of 6.1 points, far higher than next best Yale with 2.6 points and the average across all of college basketball, 3.5 points.)

There are many theories why Princeton is so dominant at home. To me, the most plausible explanation is the weird background created by the super high, curved ceiling which visiting teams seem to find disorienting. Barton Hall could provide a similar advantage for Cornell.

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

Is your Princeton historical stat just at Jadwin or does it include the earlier gyms? Princeton did not move to Jadwin until 1969.

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

Is your Princeton historical stat just at Jadwin or does it include the earlier gyms? Princeton did not move to Jadwin until 1969.

Anonymous said...

Ivy HCA figures are from the last 20 years so Princeton's number is just Jadwin, covering both great teams (1998, 1997) and the worst in program history (2007, 2008). Average for all of college basketball is the mean from 2011-12 season.

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

Numbers are probably skewed because of all the wins Harvard has given Princeton in NJ.

Anonymous said...

"Unfortunate that most Cornellians know nothing of it other than its use for concerts and pick up games."

Well, I guess unless you are involved in track and field, in which case it is one of the premier indoor facilities in the country. Weight room, hall of fame room, study lounge. NY State HS Championships, IC4A's, HEPs, all have been held there, and teams travel from all over the Northeast to participate throughout the winter when Cornell host's a meet.

But otherwise it is a shell of its former, glorious past as you'd like to lead people to believe. Only good for pick up games, ROTC and the occasional concert.

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

All of what you write is true, but Barton doesn't draw 10,000 spectators for track. It did for basketball in the glory years of the 1950s and 1960s.

If Cornell refurbished Barton for basketball, it could become a solid 7,000-9,000 seat arena with history and a very dramatic exterior and interior--- perfect for concerts and basketball.

With today's modern technology, they could continue to use it for indoor track as well (just cover the track with hardwood during basketball games.

Newman Arena would remain as the home for volleyball and could serve as a training facility for the varsity basketball teams and the site for intramurals. (They already use the facility for non-varsity sports such as physical education)

Anonymous said...

And what do we do about the "Newman Nation" student cheering section? Do they now become the Barton B------ ? Or maybe the "Barton Bully's". How about the "Barton Bunch" That's too lame. There must be a better name for them!!

Anonymous said...

First...Newman Nation is relatively new (used to be the Red Zone only 5.5 years ago). Second...Newman Nation has little to no following. With the highest following being on the night they give free t-shirts when suddenly everyone is a fan.

So, seeing as there is no history and in general Cornell is apathetic to basketball (save for the few students who read this blog), there is plenty of room to re-image to a new fan following in Barton. I'll even throw out "Barton Bears", possibly Big Red Barton Bears.

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

Cornell drew huge student crowds throughout the season last year, beyond the home opener when Newman Nation jerseys were distributed.

More than 4,000 spectators attended the Cornell home games against Columbia, Penn and Harvard. Townies did not sit on the student side.

And these numbers were not fabricated. These were Saturday night games with big attendance shows. Another Saturday game against Brown, did not draw well. Attendance was only 1,600 and there were few students in the stands. (CBB remembers the game)

Having attended most of Cornell's games, CBB can verify that the students do go to the games. And the only Ivy with as much (or more) student support is Penn.

Are the Cornell basketball games a "hot ticket" like they were in 2008, 2009 and 2010? No. Of course not. The product is not as good. But even in these last two down years, Cornell draws more student fans than Harvard (which calls 200 students in the stands a large crowd).

Newman Nation will energize again once the team starts winning again. We've seen it. We know the demand for a good product is there. When the team delivers, the fans will be there. And it is not much different in any sport at any school.

Anonymous said...

Newman Nation is still a weak nation. Attendance numbers are misleading.

You are right that when the team was winning the student section was rocking. And, I agree that in down years its hard to have an energetic section. But, just because people show up (some as drifters from hockey games for short periods which inflates attendance #'s) doesn't mean it's a quality show-up.

Personally, I don't like the Newman Nation branding. A school like Cornell, where basketball isn't a focal sport, needs branding to give the students a sense of identity and ownership towards the team; not a relatively new basketball stadium with little to no history. Cameron Crazies can get away with hit because a ton of history exists there - Cameron Indoor Stadium is PART of the Duke Basketball team/lore. Newman Arena is not.

There used to be the "Red Zone". Red Zone was weak for basketball since it's such a football term, but at least we are the Big Red, so Red Zone made some sense in that regard.

Lynah has history and a lot of it - the Lynah Faithful is a great example where it works for Cornell. Newman Nation doesn't work.

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

Points are taken, but Cornell's student section is still better than 6 of the other 7 Ivies and probably equal or better than Penn's.

Cornell also along with Penn, is the only fan section that travels for games.

Anonymous said...

Barton Beasts??

Anonymous said...

There is no way that we could fill Barton regularly. You get Newman full and it is the loudest gym in the Ivys. I'd rather play with a packed house that is loud rather than an half empty larger Barton.

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

Totally agree, you couldn't fill Barton regularly. And not suggesting it needs to be 9,000 seats.

Perhaps around 6,500-7,000 (Palestra size) would be ideal with seating behind the baskets.

Anonymous said...

Palestra seats 8722.