Wednesday, April 10, 2013

News and Notes: Wednesday Edition

Below, news and notes for Wednesday...

  • Jeff Foote (Cornell '10) finished with 4 points, 2 rebounds and 2 steals as his Zaligiris team improved to 9-1 win with a 77-67 win over Rudupis in Lithuanian LKL action last night.
  • Cathederal High School in Indianapolis notes, "Cathedral senior Collin Hartman has been named to the 2013 Indiana All-Star team. The 6’6″ forward averaged 13 ppg and 6 rpg en route to leading the Irish to a 25-6 record along with the school’s first sectional, regional, and semi-state boys basketball titles since 1998. Hartman becomes the sixth Cathedral boys basketball player and first since Errick Peck in 2009 to be named to this prestigious team."

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

The last time we had a recruit who was a star in the triple jump was....Louis Dale.

Anonymous said...

The 1954 team was champion of the EIBL, not the Ivy League. Of course the EIBL was a direct forebear of the Ivies but, still, it's simply inaccurate to call them Ivy champions.

Anonymous said...

and before that - Irvin "Bo" Roberson, and Walter Ashbaugh, both CU Hall of Famers. Walt was in the TJ in the 1952 Olympics - he had the longest legs I ever saw. Both were BB players as well as track (and Bo played football too)

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

Actually, the phrase "Ivy League" existed well before the 1954 Agreement. The term was coined in 1936. Accordingly, referring to Cornell as Ivy League champs in 1954 is factually accurate. 1954 was just the re-founding/formalization of the league.

Anonymous said...

If you go to the Ivy League website, they list every champion in every sport. The first basketball champion shown is Yale in 1957. Everybody knows what you mean if you informally call Cornell the 1954 Ivy League champion, but the statement is not "factually accurate." No attorney would ever conflate an EIBL titleist with an Ivy champ.

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

The Ivy League existed since 1901. The current league is nothing more than a formalization in 1954 of the 7 original EIBL members and a re-founding with new rules ("The Ivy Presidents' Agreement"). But we are talking apples and apples. Same league, same teams, just a re-branding with a new mission statement.

It is misleading to simply refer to 1954 as only the EIBL when the EIBL members ARE THE EXACT SAME IVY LEAGUE TEAMS.

Anonymous said...

Make sure that you contact the Ivy League office to let them know that their list of champions is incomplete.

lodger said...

any update on Galal?

Anonymous said...

I was on the 1954 BB team, and we received an NCAA medal, an EIBL medal, and a CUAA Blazer. BUT the CORNELL Daily Sun (Dick Schaap and others) called us the Ivy Champs, and so did the Philadelphia Papers. We believed we were, and could not care who the EIBL was.
Go Big Red in 2013-14!

Anonymous said...

Wonder what you'd be calling it if Harvard won in 1954, I bet it would be something far different than Ivy League champs ;-)

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

I have discussed this issue with league officials.

At the end of the day, the Ivy League and the EIBL are distinctions without any differences. So let's stop pretending the league was created in 1954. The 1954 agreement was nothing more than a formalization of a vision, a mission statement.

In reality, THE Ivy League was formed in 1901 in a hotel in NYC. The nickname "Ivy League" was given to the conference in 1936-- nearly 20 years before the Presidents met in 1954.

The 1954 Agreement did not bring the schools together. They already were together.

The folks on Nassau Street can say whatever they want in the Ivy Office. Ivy Basketball started in 1901 with Yale, Cornell, Princeton leading the formation.

Anonymous said...

I did a little surfing around the conference websites. As a point of comparison, none of sports information departments at Columbia, Dartmouth, Penn, Princeton or Yale claim their EIBL championships as Ivy titles. For example, Princeton and Penn claim "only" 26 and 25 Ivy championships, respectively. as reflected on their websites and in the banners which hang in Jadwin and The Palestra.

It appears that only CBB is pursuing the policy of "Ivy title inflation."

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

Ivy Office will not allow the 8 member schools to do so. Could care less what the Ivy Office claims to be history. We all know the league had a history before the office was created on Nassau Street.

Anonymous said...

I'm fascinated that you actually lobbied the Ivy office to allow EIBL titles to be called Ivy League championships. I'll give you credit for thoroughness, that's for sure. Obsessiveness, too.

The Cornell Basketball Blog said...

Did not "lobby" for it. Just discussed the concepts.

Ivy League is a trademark, a non-profit corporation. It can't legally claim the "EIBL" as its own as the EIBL is a different legal corporate entity.

So while legal issues prevent the League Office (and the 8 member schools) from claiming it is/was the EIBL, we as fans should all understand the history.